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Termination Letter | Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

The Termination Letter

Never sign your termination letter or release until an employment lawyer has vetted these legally binding documents. But what if you signed them already? Under rare circumstances, the executed documents can be nullified. Here’s how we successfully invalidated a signed release on behalf of our client.

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Filing a Claim With The Labour Board

If you believe your termination package is inadequate, you have two avenues to seek resolution. You can file a claim with the Ministry of Labour, commonly referred to as the Labour Board. Or you can hire an employment lawyer. The Labour Board process is free and you can easily file your papers on-line. However, before you proceed down this path, understand the limitations.

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bullying | Torso of a man in a suit with clenched fist in the foreground

Bullying in the Workplace

Bullying in the workplace is illegal. In spite of the law, reporting a bully can be a very scary step. You run the risk of retaliation if the bully is a senior or valued employee. Almost always, you will require legal assistance to navigate this minefield.

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Sham Layoffs | Tool & Die Maker

Sham Layoffs: Are You Leaving Money on The Table?

Recognizing the Signs of an Unlawful Layoff | Layoffs must meet very specific conditions outlined in the Employment Standards Act. Some employers cycle their employees through random sham layoffs, making work schedules and income so unpredictable that employees end up quitting in frustration. This is a common cost saving tactic during economic downturns to avoid termination pay.

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Young man looking pensive at a computer screen | misclassifying Contract Workers

Misclassifying Contract Workers

Ontario’s employment laws have been updated to uphold the rights of a workforce increasingly employed in the “gig economy”, with contract, part-time and temporary work. Today, employers must be clear about the status of their temps. As Dependent Contractors, they are not inferior to employees. Misclassifying them as “independent contractors” is unlawful.

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